movie night Wed. 4/29: The Incredible Shrinking Man/ Attack of the 50 Ft. Woman

Location: Soda Bar, 629 Vanderbilt Ave.

Description: ’50s sci-fi double header of Arnold’s The Incredible Shrinking Man/ Juran’s Attack of the 50 Foot Woman

Friends. Cinephiles. Boozehounds.
This Wednesday Kings County Cinema Society will host a double feature of glorious ’50s sci-fi at Soda Bar in Prospect Heights.
 
At 8PM: The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957, 80min), the classic about an emasculated everyman who finds himself shrinking after exposure to radioactive materials and insecticide while aboard a cruise.  The second half of the film is some of the best sci-fi of the era (maybe ever), with the one-inch-tall Scott Carey doing battle with enormous menacing housecats and tarantulas. 
Because we’re all clever and paradoxical, we’ll follow it with Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958, 65min), the charming story of an alcoholic, spurned housewife who, following an encounter with alien beings, grows giant and goes on the warpath. Legendarily awful special effects follow. We’ll start this one at 9:30pm
“Incredibly huge! With incredible desires for love! And vengeance!  …Death and Desire!”
“Shrinking Man” is one of the few popular Hollywood films to deal directly with metaphysics and existentialism (“What happens when we disappear??”) while “50 Ft. Woman” asks something much more terrifying (“What happens when a total psycho hosebeast grows to three strories tall and starts tearing up Los Angeles??”)  Come for one. Come for both. Come for half of the first. We ain’t picky.
 
SODA BAR is at 629 Vanderbilt Ave. right off of St. Marks Ave.
2/3 to Grand Army Plaza or B/Q to 7th Ave. Look for us on the comfy couches in the back.


Field trip to Anthology for Shirley Clarke's THE COOL WORLD, Wed. 4/22, 8:30pm

On occasion, we at Kings County Cinema Society simply can’t match the programming of venerable NYC film institutions, and tomorrow, Wed. 4/22, Anthology Film Archives has schooled us, so we’ll be planning a field trip to check out Shirley Clarke’s 1964 breakthrough film The Cool World, the first narrative feature to be shot on location in Harlem.  Clarke was a true pioneer of the city’s burgeoning underground film movement in the late ’50s/’60s and a founder of the Filmmakers Co-op. She moved from experimental works to documentaries to filmed dance to full length features… The Cool World, shot around 120th st. with non-professional actors as roving street gangs, presents a startlingly honest portrayal of the urban experience and youth culture, and practically predicts the Black Power movement that swept the nation later in the decade. Part of AFA’s tribute to Clarke, running through Apr 28.
Good luck ever finding this one on DVD, and the distributor charges $400 to borrow a crap-tacular faded VHS copy. This is why god invented repertory movie houses. A must-see movie night. Bring your pals.

http://www.anthologyfilmarchives.org/schedule/search/film/?id=9279

Here, courtesy of the treasure trove of avant garde and non-narrative film and video over at ubuweb, is a reel of five short films by Clarke (unfortunately on a single track). The highlight here (for me anyway) is Bridges-Go-Round (1958), which starts at the 15:30 mark. Enjoy!
http://www.ubu.com/film/clarke.html

Regards,
Shimkin and Kings County


A Night of the Sacred and the Profane, Wed. 4/15

Title: A Night of Sacrilegious Cinema

Location: Vox Pop Cafe

Description: King’s County Cinema Society presents a triptych of films dedicated to the sacred and the profane:

Wednesday night at Vox Pop, KCCS will showcase three short masterpieces of humor, irreverence and savage social criticism by three legendary provocateurs – in order: Pier Pasolini’s La Ricotta (1963, 20 min), Werner Herzog’s God’s Angry Man (1980, 43 min) and Luis Bunuel’s Simon of the Desert (1965, 42 min).
Orson Welles stars as Pasolini himself in La Ricotta (a.k.a. Curd Cheese) in which actors on the set of a film of the life of Christ take on roles simply to gorge themselves on free food; Herzog looks at TV evangelism through Dr. Eugene Scott of California, who imagines enemies everywhere and insults his viewers for not sending him more money; and Simon of the Desert follows an ascetic continually tempted by Satan, who finally casts off his piousness and joins the Devil at a swingin’ 60s night club where the band on stage plays a tune called “Radioactive Flesh,” in Bunuel’s hilarious vision of Hell. Wow.

*Movies start at 8PM and will be screening at Vox Pop (voxpopnet.net), followed by a live band at 10. Vox Pop is located at 1022 Cortelyou Rd, corner of Stratford Rd, in Ditmas Park. Take the Q to Cortelyou, take a left out of the station and walk four blocks.
Bring food/drink, roommates, friends and heathen tendencies.
KCCS is also accepting films for it’s Emerging Directors program. For more information, contact kingscountycinemasociety@gmail.com.

Hope to see you all for some sacrilegious cinema!
Cheers,
Shimkin for KCCS


A Night of Bloody Meat and Musicals

Title: A Night of Bloody Meat and Musicals
Location: Freddy’s Bar and Backroom
Description: Dearest KCCS members,

Over 3,500 years ago the Hindu poet-sage Valmiki sang the first Ramayana in Sanskrit, and this Wednesday at Freddy’s
you will experience what film critic Nathan Lee calls a “surrealist Indonesian pomo-folkloric/funkadelic musical–slash–avant-garde pop-and-lock revolutionary romance–slash–Hindu song-and-dance-installation art extravaganza” version of India’s greatest and most cherished epics.

Please join us for a screening of Opera Jawa (Garin Nugroho, 2006, 2 awards), a visual folk carnival ride that is filled with nightmarish puppeteering, deranged solos next to animal carcasses, frenetic Gamelan music, and lurid come-ons such as “my sperm sparkles in the heavens.”

To kick off Opera Jawa (the only musical I can think of that starts with a song about pig livers), will be a screening of Bye Bye Burger (Mike Sobo, 2006), a glistening red cinematic sirloin steak set in a 1950s butcher shop. Nominated for a Junior Oscar, the film follows the predicament of Alphonse, a graceless young butcher boy who falls in love with a vegetarian.

Bye Bye Burger is the first in KCCS’ series of Emerging Directors, if you would like to submit a film or desire more information, please contact kingscountycinemasociety@gmail.com.

See you then,

Marcia
Start Time: 9:00pm
Date: 2009-04-08